HISTORY-SEE ATTACHED-9 SOURCES FROM ATTACHED SOURCE BOARDS

Writing Assignment III – Final Essay
Note: this assignment may use the same topic, evidence, and perspective as Writing Assignments I and/or II, unless you want to change topic
Before you begin work on Writing Assignment III, be sure to complete the Learning Unit for Writing Assignment III. Take notes. Be sure you understand what is expected so you can earn the highest grade possible.
Then print this page to guide you as you write.
Themes:
This week we begin our most significant writing, emphasizing themes. We have been practicing so we can get to this point, doing more of what historians actually do.
As you know, historians do not memorize facts. They see trends throughout time, and use these trends to understand both the past and the present.
A historical theme is a trend, presented as an interpretive thesis, but supported by evidence from several different eras instead of just one or two.
Each week, we will continue to post evidence from one particular timeframe or era in the Primary Sources Board, but our writing must include evidence from multiple eras.
Themes are narrow enough to have a point of view, even though they are broad enough to cover several eras. They show a repeating trend, rather than progress over time.
One way to begin a theme is to focus on a topic area, such as fashion, sexuality, class differences, cloth-making technology, the role of philosophy, ways in which literature reflects society, sports, games, furniture design, domestic architecture, dancing, political conflict, holiday celebrations, religious texts, expressions of spirituality, mass communication – the possibilities are endless.
Avoid problems with themes
Here’s a list of common problems to avoid for themes:
The progressive theme problem.
The theme features advancement or improvement over time, when it needs to focus on a repeating trend.
The “throughout history” problem.
The theme should not use phrases like “throughout history” or “across the ages”.
The “and” problem.
The theme should not try to cover more bases by using “and”, unless everything in it is proven in every paragraph.
The “or” problem.
The theme should not contain “or”, which encourages paragraphs that focus on only part of the theme.
The so broad it’s obvious problem.
This is similar to the big, factual thesis problem.
Format: Full Essay
For this assignment we start with a theme (in bold text), and use nine sources in sets of three, each set supporting a topic sentence (in italics) that covers them all. Write an essay, with no numbers or letters:
I. Historical theme and introduction
II. Topic sentence that supports the theme
A. Primary source #1 with explanation
B. Primary source #2 with explanation
C. Primary source #3 with explanation
III. Topic sentence that supports the theme
A. Primary source #4 with explanation
B. Primary source #5 with explanation
C. Primary source #6 with explanation
IV. Topic sentence that supports the theme
A. Primary source #7 with explanation
B. Primary source #8 with explanation
C. Primary source #9 with explanation
V. Brief conclusion
The introduction should explain your theme. The conclusion may either summarize, or tell about aspects that may require further research.
You can see samples of Writing Assignment III- Final Essays on the Information page (linked from the left-hand menu in Canvas).
Writing assignment instructions:
Create a theme and three topic sentences, each supported by three fully-cited primary sources from various Primary Sources Boards, with a brief explanation of how each source supports the topic. All sources must be from a Primary Sources Board (you may add any fully cited sources to any Board at any time).
Grading is based on the quality of the theme, the use and citation of primary sources, adherence to formatting rules, and the use of college-level writing.

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